Connect with us

Christian Living

10 quotables from Kevin de Young’s ‘Crazy Busy’

Much like ‘Dangerous Calling‘ in 2012, Kevin de Young’s new book ‘Crazy Busy‘ served me greatly.

I recommend it to busy people, and even people who may not think they’re that busy:

“We’re not actually in danger of working too hard. We simply work hard at things in the wrong proportions. If you work eighty hours a week and never see your kids and never talk to your wife, people may call you a workaholic. And no doubt you’re putting a lot of effort into your career. But you may not be working very hard at being a dad or being a husband or being a man after God’s own heart.”

As I read back over my notes and reflected on what God wanted to teach me from this book, I summarised it in 4 points:

  1. Beware of the dangers of busyness
  2. Make priorities (Jesus did)
  3. Rest well
  4. Pursue godly habits

Here’s 10 quotables (in no particular order) that stood out to me from the book:

  1. “The greatest danger of busyness is that there may be greater dangers you never have time to consider”.
  2. “Busyness does not mean you are a faithful or fruitful Christian. If only means you are busy, just like everyone else.”
  3. “We are busy because we try to do too many things. We do too many things because we say yes to too many people. We say yes to all these people because we want them to like us and we fear their disapproval. It’s not wrong to be kind. In fact, it’s the mark of a Christian to be a servant. But people-pleasing is something else. Doing the cookie drive so you can love others is one thing. Doing the cookie drive so that others might love you is quite another. So much of our busyness comes down to meeting people’s expectations.”
  4. “I think most Christians hear these urgent calls to do more (or feel them internally already) and learn to live with a low-level guilt that comes from not doing enough. We know we can always pray more and give more and evangelize more, so we get used to living in a state of mild disappointment with ourselves”.
  5. “Jesus didn’t do it all. Jesus didn’t meet every need. He left people waiting in line to be healed. He left one town to preach to another. He hid away to pray. He got tired. He never interacted with the vast majority of people on the planet. He spent thirty years in training and only three years in ministry. He did not try to do it all. And yet, he did everything God asked him to do”.
  6. “I have often marveled to think that Jesus was so terrifically busy, but only with the things he was supposed to do…He was busy, but never in a way that made him frantic, anxious, irritable, proud, envious, or distracted by lesser things…Jesus knew the difference between urgent and important. He understood that all the good things he could do were not necessarily the things he ought to do…Jesus understood his mission. He was not driven by the needs of others, though he often stopped to help hurting people. He was not driven by the approval of others, though he cared deeply for the lost and the broken.”
  7. “Stewarding my time is not about selfishly pursuing only the things I like to do. It’s about effectively serving others in the ways I’m best able to serve and in the ways I am most uniquely called to serve…“Unseized” time tends to flow toward our weakness, get swallowed up by dominant people, and surrender to the demands of emergencies. So unless God intends for us to serve only the loudest, neediest, most intimidating people, we need to plan ahead, set priorities, and serve more wisely so that we might serve more effectively.”
  8. “We’re not actually in danger of working too hard. We simply work hard at things in the wrong proportions. If you work eighty hours a week and never see your kids and never talk to your wife, people may call you a workaholic. And no doubt you’re putting a lot of effort into your career. But you may not be working very hard at being a dad or being a husband or being a man after God’s own heart.”
  9. “If someone recorded your life for a week and then showed it to a group of strangers, what would they guess is the “good portion” in your life? What would they conclude is the one thing you must get done every day? Folding the laundry? Cleaning the house? Catching up on e-mails? Posting to Facebook? Mowing the lawn? Watching the game? I know you have things to do. I have plenty to do myself. But out of all the concerns in our lives, can we honestly say and show that sitting at the feet of Jesus is the one thing that is necessary?”
  10. “Few things demonstrate our devotion to Christ more than making time with him a priority each day.”
Continue Reading
4 Comments

4 Comments

Leave a Comment

Advertisement

Popular

Advertisement
Advertisement Medium Rectangle Banner 1
Advertisement
To Top
New resources, direct to your inbox
Send this to a friend